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Posts Tagged ‘landscapes’

“Nature will bear the closest inspection. She invites us to lay our eye level with her smallest leaf, and take an insect view of its plain.”
Henry David Thoreau

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Serendipity Farm is almost devoid of plains. Plains are not something that we get to see a lot of here in Tasmania. I struggled to find a few photos of “plains”. I then remembered that “plain” means more than one thing! I want to share someone here who is just “plain old comfortable”…

Bezial found a sunbeam

Bezial found a sunbeam

And here is one of the bush tracks within an hour of Serendipity Farm that we can head off to whenever we get bored of our regular dog walking tracks…it’s just “plain gorgeous”…

Cool Temperate Sclerophyll Forest track in Northern Tasmania

Cool Temperate Sclerophyll Forest track in Northern Tasmania

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I (Sincerely, Emily) and in the same boat with Fran (figuratively speaking of course.) No open plains or prairies with beautifully dancing grasses. Just plain life happening around here.

A plain view of dinner (not quite a landscape, is it?)

dinnergetting ready for a plant sale as part of the local garden club I belong to.

Need to keep an eye on that deer in the left of the photo! She will come and munch on everything

Need to keep an eye on that deer in the left of the photo! She will come and munch on everything

I want to say “just plain life,” but my life is anything but plain. There is a lot of “not dabbling in normal” around here.

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The plains are my (Alexandra) landscape. Although I spent my childhood in the rocky passages of Pennsylvania, my heart belongs to the prairie. My brother has an eye for its beauty:

9643416005_e067fbeb9f_bphoto: (c) Andrew Paul Nelson 2013

Do you have great views of plains in your area?

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It is only in appearance that time is a river. It is rather a vast landscape and it is the eye of the beholder that moves.
Thornton Wilder

While the river of life glides along smoothly, it remains the same river; only the landscape on either bank seems to change.
Max Muller

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What lovely sentiments. Serendipity Farm is perched on a hillside that flows down into the Tamar river. Where we live, the river is salt water but further inland it’s freshwater. The locals in Sidmouth call themselves “The River Rats” and I guess Steve and I have a few more years to go before we get to swim with that esteemed pack but for now we don’t mind having to wear our water wings and tread water alongside. The first thing that I see when the sun comes up outside my kitchen window is the river. It’s become an integral part of Serendipity Farm life.

One of the small tributaries that flow together to form our river

One of the small tributaries that flow together to form our river

The river always has “just one more” picture left in it…I could photograph the river all day and still come up with more. The tides here are rapid and regular and you could set your watch by them. The river swirls and near the banks it forms little whirlpools that unhappy kayakers spend ages trying to get out of. The river has a sense of humour.

Swans on the river

Swans on the river

When we walk the dogs in the morning we are reminded constantly of just how lucky we are to be living in our neck of the woods. The river has become part of us now and we have developed a deep respect for it’s ebb and flow.

IMG_2637

Early evening river shot

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Rivers…. hmmmm. All I (Sincerely, Emily) can say is that It is drier than dry here in South Texas. While there are some rivers flowing, they are very very low, most have dried up. But, not so long ago (4 years) our front and back yards were a river. When it rains here, Texas-style, it can come down inches at a time. The dry earth cannot soak it up and it runs off very fast. Things can get exciting around here.

River in our backyard (Sept 2009)

River in our backyard (Sept 2009)

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I (Alexandra) love “wild” water– not white water, but rivers and steams in nature. One of my life’s biggest thrills was stepping into the Mississippi. Last week I swam in the Youghigheny (Yak-a-gainy) in southwestern Pennsylvania with my buddies Holly and “Corndog.”

Holly and Skye at the Youghiopyle River

youghiogheny falls

Skye at Brady's Run Dog Park

Are there any rivers in your area?

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Hill Country

I mentioned in our Sunday post that I live in the Texas Hill Country. I am been looking through files of photos, and still can’t seem to come up with any “hill” photos!

I did find a nice photo of a “hill” of mulch.

A pile (I mean hill) of mulch in the background

A pile (I mean hill) of mulch in the background

I also managed to find a photo of the “hill” with wild flowers on it form this past spring. It really is a fake hill since it is man-made on the exit ramp off the highway. But is it pretty.013I don’t seem to have many photos of the landscape around me.  That doesn’t mean my head is constantly down. I continually look around me. I watch the birds and red hawk in the trees and sky. I watch the deer wander by (I am not too happy with the deer right now, but I still enjoy their beauty.)

Do you enjoy the landscape around you?

Sincerely, Emily

You can see what else I am up to over at Sincerely, Emily. The topics are varied, as I jump around from gardening to sewing to making bread or lotion and many things in between.

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Where every you live, you are surrounded by landscape. You can walk down the street, bike down the road, or drive to a neighboring town. As you do, the landscape changes around you. Hills tell amazing stories.

“After climbing a great hill, one only finds that there are many more hills to climb.”   Nelson Mandela

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Since I (Sincerely, Emily) live in the Hill Country in Texas, you would think that I would have some great hill photos. Nope. My head (and camera) has been in the garden and the back yard too much I guess. I did get a great shot of what is under our hills here. Limestone. Solid limestone. So when I want to plant a tree, I ask my husband to dig a hole. Not an easy task and it involves a 40 lb tamping bar. Now you know why. Limestone! Hills 2I also took a photo standing in the doctors parking lot, at the top of one of the hills. There is a really nice view out over the other hills from there.
Hills 1***

I narf7 (theroadtoserendipity) live in Tasmania and as Tasmania is entirely comprised of extinct volcano’s so you can bet your bottom dollar that we would be able to find a hill somewhere around. Serendipity Farm is perched precariously on the side of a hill and over the last few months the hill has done its level best to flush us into the sea. We have been having some torrential downpours over our winter season and despite the gushing water’s best efforts to erode us away, we are still clinging tenaciously to the side of our hillside. I would like to share a couple of photos that my brother took when he was visiting Tasmania a few years ago. The first one is of Cradle Mountain, a must-see place for tourists to go when they find themselves deposited in our little far flung neck of the woods

DSCF5219The second image is of Cataract Gorge in the middle of Launceston City. An amazing photo opportunity for tourists and they don’t even have to hire a car to get there :).

DSCF5117When we lived in Western Australia we lived in limestone country but now we live in Tassie it’s volcanic rock and acidic soils all round. We might have the exact opposite on the pH spectrum from Emily (above) but we have the same problem whenever we want to dig a hole. We love living on our little serendipitous hill and wouldn’t swap it for “quids”.

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The verse says “I will lift up mine eyes unto the hills, from whence cometh my help.” I’m (Alexandra) a flatlander– the prairie landscape speaks to me. But, oh, hills.13- Millville house and garden 10- Lower Lawrenceville***

Do you enjoy the hills in the landscape around you?

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