Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Australia’

Hi All,

When I saw that one of the topics for us to delve into was “Rivers” I smiled. The front gate of our property (Serendipity Farm) is just over the road from the river…

The view of the Tamar River from our deck

The view of the Tamar River from our deck

The road near our home

The road near our home

When I look out of the window I see the river. The Tamar River is part of our lives and our constant companion. It keeps the property cooler in summer and warmer in winter and allows us to grow plants on the property that would succumb to frost anywhere else. It is the culmination of the North Esk River and the South Esk River and is subject to some pretty wild tides at certain times of the day. Here are 2 of the smaller tributaries that flow into the North Esk River to eventually form the Tamar River…

DSCF5201

I bet there are trout here!

Liffey Falls

Liffey Falls

The river is salt water where we are but the South and North Esk are both freshwater and full of trout and eels. Where we live is a shark nursery and in summer the water is full of these jellyfish that flow in and out to sea on the tide…

The kind of jellyfish that the Chinese dry and eat. I am yet to attempt this...

The kind of jellyfish that the Chinese dry and eat. I am yet to attempt this…

The Batman Bridge spans the river from the West side (our side) to the East side and is the only way to cross the Tamar River outside of Launceston…

An early evening shot of The Batman Bridge

An early evening shot of The Batman Bridge

It took a long time to get used to riverbanks with black volcanic soil and smooth round pebbles. In Western Australia I was used to white sand and shells. This image shows some of the driftwood that we regularly see on the riverbanks as we walk the dogs it was taken directly opposite our front gate…

The river taken just opposite our gate

The river taken just opposite our gate

When my father died he left us Serendipity Farm and he also left Steve this small aluminium dinghy. Steve promptly ignored it for the first year that we were here but last year it was christened “The Mumbly Cumumbus” and set sail on the high seas regularly. Here are some photos that Steve took while he was out fish and pootling about on the river…

The good ship Mumbly Cumumbus on one of last summers voyages

The good ship Mumbly Cumumbus on one of last summers voyages

A Steve eye view of the world in the Mumbly Cumumbus

A Steve eye view of the world in the Mumbly Cumumbus

A small excursion up the river to Deviot our neighbouring town

A small excursion up the river to Deviot our neighbouring town

A lovely shot Steve took of Redwood Island, not far from Serendipity Farm

A lovely shot Steve took of Redwood Island, not far from Serendipity Farm

If you look VERY carefully to the right of the Auld Kirk Church in this photo you might be able to find our house...

If you look VERY carefully to the right of the Auld Kirk Church in this photo you might be able to find our house…

Steve and I are studying at the moment and part of our course involves learning how to manipulate images. Steve took a photo of a Serendipity Farm sunset taken towards the river and turned it into a Christmas Bauble…by the way…there are only 106 days left till Christmas 2013…

Pity this wasn't one of our assessments

Pity this wasn’t one of our assessments

Read Full Post »

Hi All,

Before we moved to Tasmania and Serendipity Farm, we lived on the other side of the country in Western Australia. Western Australia is relatively flat, at least the lower south-west corner where we lived was. The closest thing that we came to anything impressive was Bluff Knoll, a try-hard mountain that was only considered a mountain because of the serious dearth of anything hilly anywhere near it to make it have to back up its claims. When we moved to Tasmania we discovered just how hilly it is here. This is a local rocky outcrop complete with waterfall…

A rocky Northern Tasmanian outcrop not too far from Cradle Mountain

A rocky Northern Tasmanian outcrop not too far from Cradle Mountain

Tasmania is almost entirely comprised of extinct volcanos and there are mountainous regions the length and breadth of this small state. One of the most beautiful is Cradle Mountain, a tourist drawcard and a very beautiful example of what nature can do when she is finished heaving the earth all over the place. Here are a few images my brother took on a past visit of Cradle Mountain. Steve and I haven’t been there yet but are planning a visit soon…

Cradle Mountain

Cradle Mountain

DSCF5223

Dove Lake at Cradle Mountain

This next image was taken at the top of Mt. Barrow by our (then) Diploma in Horticulture lecturer whose son Gene you can see in the photo between Steve and I. Nick had heard that my mother (also in the image) was coming to visit Tasmania and asked us all around to his home for lunch. We then drove to the top of Mt Barrow to show mum the view…

DSCF6323

Some hills are bigger than others. This “hill” doesn’t look all that big but apparently an Edmond Hillary wanabe has staked his claim to the top. This small pile of ex-fish farm netting is now forming the walls of a very large fully enclosed vegetable garden that we are working on at the moment to stop the native animals on Serendipity Farm from eating all of our hard work…

DSCF1239

Apparently this pile of ex fish farm netting has been claimed in the name of the queen…what the queen would want with it is anyone’s guess!

Apparently an Aussie invented the good old Hills Hoist and as an honorary “hill” I am going to share a few images of them with you…

Every young Aussie's rite of Hills Hoist passage...

Every young Aussie’s rite of Hills Hoist passage…

new no dig at Pens

The hills hoist where we used to live in Launceston with the vegetable garden that we created

This guy is Adam “Hill”. He’s an Aussie comedian and as you can see, he loves his mum…

Adam Hills, a man that knows who is holding the wooden spoon

Adam Hills, a man that knows who is holding the wooden spoon

The reward at the top of a very steep hill just around the corner from us is this little plant stall selling potted plants for $2 a pot. I get to walk Earl up the hill, I get exercise AND I get a plant…talk about incentive to climb a hill…

You just never know what this stall will have from one day to the next, its like the plant lottery

You just never know what this stall will have from one day to the next, its like the plant lottery

Here you can see a man dealing with his own “mountain” of work. When we first moved to Serendipity Farm it was a wasteland of weeds and Steve is in the process of cutting up some fallen timber before we both headed into this jungle to remove that infestation of overgrown honeysuckle…

DSCF6295

The jungle that was Serendipity Farm 2011

Lastly I would like to share something with you here that my regular bloggers would pay money to see. I spend quite a lot of time complaining about our local cyclist community. I have no problem with people who ride pushbikes, just the riders that wear lycra and use “cycling” as a way to elevate themselves socially…can’t STAND them! But if the truth be known…once in a past life, narf7 used to cycle 40km a day…in LYCRA! But I only wore the bike shorts because my brother gave them to me because my posterior was suffering incredibly on my narrow bike seat…it’s my story and I am sticking to it! This series of images was taken back in 1998 after I rode a 100km round trip and was decidedly tired…

Cold hard proof that I once rode a pushbike

Cold hard proof that I once rode a pushbike

So that’s my hilly post for NDIN. I hope you didn’t mind that I explored the connotations of “Hill” but it won’t be the first time that narf7 takes off on a tangent here ;).

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: