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Posts Tagged ‘fall’

Did you know that pumpkin seeds (and to some extent, the flesh) have anti parasitic properties in ruminants? Our sheep always come running when they see the tasty round orbs in my hands as I approach their fields. I admit, it’s super satisfying to watch them explode across the ground as I toss them into the field, too!

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Our sheep aren’t the only ones who enjoy the pumpkins, though. Our chickens and ducks do too, and I’ve broken up more than one squabble as the hens have fought over the perfect pumpkin seed or strand of pumpkin guts. Our turkey, however, cannot be bothered by treat-like morsels this morning. He is too busy professing his love to one of the Cochin hens, strutting about and poofing up like a love-struck teenager. Poor chap, I’m not sure if it’s more sad that he’s crossed in love, or that his days are numbered in general.

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One other form of natural parasite control that we use is pine needles, and the sheep get branches from our windbreak weekly throughout the winter. For now, though, I find myself begging and bartering for leftover pumpkins and squash into the depths of the fall season.

Have you ever used a natural form of parasite control for your livestock or pets?

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October has been a busy month around here. One of the projects I have taken on is raising my raised bed – higher. You can see in the photo below that I have finished about half of the beds. I was really pushing to get them all done before I left for Minnesota and Wisconsin, but that just didn’t happen. In fact, I still haven’t finished them.

Raising the beds higher

I have two full beds of pepper still growing and producing, and I can’t bring myself to pull them out just to finished those two beds. I haven’t been able to find onion sets to plant yet, and usually don’t plant those for another 2-4 weeks anyway, so the peppers can keep on growing.  The seeds I have started (winter veg) are so far behind that I broke down (again – happened last year too) and bought things from a local nursery so I could get some of the beds planted and started before I left town. We have been still quite warm here (high 80’sF) with warm nights in the 70’s and very humid over the past few weeks. I haven’t even thought to start lettuce yet, but that’s alright, some of the volunteers are coming up in the walkways between the beds and I have transplanted them. They are growing really well and I can start picking lettuce!

planting some winter veg

The cabbage, lettuce and broccoli in the photo above where planted 2 weeks ago and are growing really well. They are growing so well that you can’t even see much of the exposed dirt anymore, they are filling out nicely!

Time to harvest the lemon grass (and some comfrey too)

I have epazote (above) that has gone to seed and lemongrass that still needs to be harvested. The comfrey is looking very very happy with the cooler temps of fall. All of my herbs have really perked up after a long, hot, dry summer. I have taken cuttings from some of them and they are ready to get planted around the various herb and flower gardens. Little by little I will take more cuttings of the different herbs to use for plants swaps and also around my gardens.

Peppers are still growing

The pepper plants are also thriving in the cooler temps. I am always thrilled if I can keep the plants alive through the hot summer months because I know once the temps get into the low 90’s and 80’s that those plants will just take off and go wild. They haven’t proven me wrong this fall and I have a counter full of peppers. The hyacinth bean vine is also showing off, finally. It grows well in the hot summer months here, but it doesn’t bloom until late September or early October. Sometimes I get frustrated waiting, but when the temps drop (again, below the high 90’s) the vines really improve overall and the flowers start blooming.

I have many more things to plant and look forward to a wonderful fall/winter garden.

Thursday night we dipped down to 60F (I know that would be a heatwave for those of you living in the north part of the Northern Hemisphere) and all day Friday we hovered around 60F. I finally feel fall!

What is growing in your garden right now?

Sincerely, Emily

You can see what else I am up to over at Sincerely, Emily. The topics are varied, as I jump around from gardening to sewing to making bread or lotion and many things in between.

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Burnt orange, brown and mustard yellow have always been my favorite colors. That is they WERE my favorite colors until i moved to Austin, TX: land of the UT Longhorns with the team color of burnt orange. Burnt orange coated, no SATURATED that city and i wanted nothing to do with any affiliation with a sport team, so i quit wearing burnt orange. Luckily i moved! Now i live in a town with team colors in….. ORANGE! haha. Ah well, it’s Fall and i’m wearing orange, darnit!

I picked up some lovely batts of pygora fiber at this summer’s Black Sheep Gathering and spun it into a lovely three-ply yarn. I’ve finished my husband’s knit hat in time for the cooler weather, and it’s not quite Christmas knitting crunch time (though in reality, it probably already is) so i’m knitting myself something. Despite never having worn a cowl, or knitted lace – i’m combining both into my current experiemental knitting project. Doesn’t this yarn just scream autumn? I think so.

Read more about my knitting adventure and get the “pattern” for achieving this lacey look over at today’s Pocket Pause.

Are you a knitter? Do you rely on patterns and charts, or do you ever just wing it?

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Sunday Photos…October

“Listen! the wind is rising, and the air is wild with leaves,
We have had our summer evenings, now for October eves!”

Humbert Wolfe, 1885-1940

October is such a beautiful month here in Ohio. The air is cool and crisp, the days are clear and bright, the leaves are spectacular in the shades of reds and yellows and there seems to be a sense of excitement in the air. The apples are delicious, the cider is tasty, it’s perfect campfire weather, and there are plenty of outdoor chores to finish up making sure you get outside to enjoy the last of the nice weather.




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October in Tennessee is a fickle one. It’s not unusual to have our first frosts followed by warmer, summer-like days. In the mornings, our rolling hills are smothered in misty clouds of fog and dew. About the middle of the month our leaves really start to change, and by November 1st we’re at the hight of our season. October is the month I like the most, for the feeling of making my nest at home, adoring the amazing colors, appreciating the cooler weather, and spending lots of time with my family outdoors.

 sunrise

good freaking morning

mushrooms

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What’s October like in your neck of the woods?

 

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