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Archive for the ‘chickens’ Category

It’s been a LONG time since I’ve posted here at NDiN, a really long time, probably over a year, maybe more (so sorry). You may have been wondering if I fell off the face of the earth. That didn’t happen, but I did buy a place in Maine, meanwhile, we fixed up our home in Ohio, then we moved to Maine, sold our place in Ohio and proceeded to spend every waking moment catching up on work (we’re self-employed). While I was able to keep my main blog Chiot’s Run and podcast (Cultivate Simple) going, most everything else fell by the wayside. How is my life different after being gone for a year?
Welcome 2
I have a HUGE garden. After being limited to about a quarter of an acre in Ohio, I now live on 153 acres in Maine. Most of it is wooded, but about 10 acres are cleared. My edible garden space consists of about 6,000 sq feet. YIKES, that’s a lot of weeding!
Welcome (1)
I have chickens, and guineas, and ducks, and more chickens, oh yeah, and a couple of pigs. Keeping chickens was always on my wish list, in our small lake community in Ohio they were viewed as “livestock” and too agrarian for the posh lake lifestyle of our neighbors. When we purchased this place it came with an instant flock of 12 chickens and a rooster. We’ve lost a few and added a few. We currently have a flock of 15 laying hens with a beautiful Silver Laced Wyandotte rooster. We also have 17 meat birds on the front lawn. Three guineas were added to the mix a few months ago, they hatched out 15 keets a few weeks ago.
Welcome
We bartered maple syrup for some Muscovy ducks last fall, a few were eaten by foxes (along with a few of our chickens), the rest graced our table. We have one pair that remains, and she just hatched out 9 beautiful ducklings. These little guys will hopefully build up to become a decent flock, providing fowl for our table in the coming years. They’re so much easier than chickens if you’re interested in meat birds.
Welcome 1
This spring, we took the plunge and got some pigs. Crazy – I know. Two piggies were introduced to help us clear the garden of weeds and to help keep the undergrowth in the woodlot under control. So far pigs have become our most favorite barnyard animal. What will we ever do with that much bacon? Not sure, we’re thinking that we can use the extra pork to barter with other goods from our neighbors.
Welcome 3
It’s been a crazy busy ride, things will hopefully settle down this winter. Lucky for us we’re full of youthful energy still and are highly motivated to get things done. We have dreams bigger than our budgets and time, but don’t we all. Life is really all about trying to find a balance, working hard but still finding time to enjoy what you’re working so hard for.

What have you been doing over the past year?

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Yes, i’m just 30 years old and a new grandma….

to a little baby chick! Although we moved away from our Austin homestead in June and had to sell or give away each of our 4 pet hens, we’re luckily still in contact with some of the lovely people who re-homed them, and even get happy updates from them on occasion. I’m so excited to share one recent piece of news: a birth announcement!

BB and her second egg, proud mamas us both

BB and her second egg, proud mamas us both

BB was our broodiest hen: a partridge colored Chanteclar hen (Chanteclars are an endangered breed from Canada). We lovingly called her our ‘football chicken’ because she was the smallest of our flock, but her size didn’t prevent her from being head hen, or as we also called her the “mob boss” (because Soot thought she was head hen, but was really just the “thug” of the group.) BB layed funny, tiny little eggs that often had grooves on them and was prone to broodiness (sitting on the eggs to try and hatch them). If you visited us, you might find a “chicken in the house” to try and encourage her to leave her nonexistent brood and get over the habit.

Broody BB catches some AC and Pocket wonders why there's a chicken in the house

I’d hoped to find her a new home with a Chanteclar rooster in order to procreate the breed, but was unable to find one. I did find an amazing chicken-oriented woman south of town with 5 acres and many happy chickens. BB settled in great right away, and now after about 9 months she’s hatched her very own egg.

Congrats, BB: it finally happened!

You can find more from Miranda at her blog, Pocket Pause.

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